Sequoia Story

Sequoias are the world’s most ancient trees on records. The largest of the species is the Giant Sequoias which live up to 3000 years old, and can be as tall as 300 feet (27 storeys), with a base diameter of up to 35 feet. Sequoias have roots that are surprisingly shallow - the curious question is how is it that these giants manage to hold themselves up with such shallow roots? Scientists found an answer that was striking – these trees have a strong network of roots that reach out and provide support for one another as they grow.

In what ways might we be like (or not like) Sequoias? Do we provide for support for one another as we grow? Are our connections grounded by the same values and beliefs?

When the mother Sequoia eventually dies, her roots continue to provide support to other baby Sequoias growing around her. The young trees also depend on the mother tree for support and nourishment supplied through its tap roots.

What legacy do we leave behind, when we eventually leave a place? And does what we leave behind continue to provide support for others? Have the people we left behind become stronger, wiser, and better off than we were, because we were there with them before?